USFWS Proposed Improvements To ESA Supported by SCI

SCI first for hunters logoSafari Club International supports major proposed revisions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to its Endangered Species Act regulations that were announced today.“Today’s announcement ushers in a major move forward for the FWS.  At long last, we have leadership that recognizes the importance of flexibility in the conservation of federally listed wildlife and the recognition that different approaches, including sustainable use, can be used to recover and sustain the world’s wildlife,” said SCI President Paul Babaz.

Of the many proposed changes, SCI generally supports the proposals to provide more flexibility to the management and recovery of threatened species and to modify how the agency establishes the “foreseeable future” when making threatened listing decisions.

Under one proposal, the FWS would decide on a species-by-species basis what, if any, ESA prohibitions would apply to each species listed as threatened.  The ESA itself applies these prohibitions (e.g., regarding take and import) only to endangered species.  Congress envisioned that the FWS would decide individually what prohibitions applied to each particular threatened species.

But the FWS long ago adopted a blanket rule that the statutory prohibitions would automatically apply to all threatened species, unless the FWS adopted a “special rule” specific to a particular species that spelled out what restrictions applied.

The FWS’s sister agency in implementing the ESA, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), followed Congressional intent and did not adopt the blanket rule.  The FWS’s proposal would align it with NMFS and Congressional intent.

The FWS’s proposal would ensure that, moving forward, all threatened species receive the level of protection that is appropriate for each species.  This approach will free-up limited resources for more targeted and efficient recovery of threatened and endangered species.

SCI also supports the FWS’s consideration of revisions to how it establishes the “foreseeable future.”  The ESA defines a threatened species as one that is likely to become an endangered species within the “foreseeable future.”

Under the proposed change, the foreseeable future would extend only as far as the agency can reasonably determine that both the future threats and the species’ responses to those threats are “probable.”  While refinement of this proposal may be necessary, SCI hopes that whatever the FWS adopts will help avoid future threatened listings such as the unwarranted listing of the polar bear, which used an excessive 45-year foreseeable future.

Other proposed changes include streamlining critical habitat designations, modifying ESA consultation requirements for other federal agencies, and clarifying how the agencies make decisions to delist species.

The FWS will accept comments on the proposals for 60 days after the upcoming publication of the proposals in the Federal Register.  SCI will provide comments.


Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.International Headquarters Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona · Ottawa, Canada
www.SafariClub.org


San Juan County 4-H Air Rifle Team 2018 Season

Four Corners SCI provided the San Juan County 4-H Air Rifle Team with a grant to assist in their trip to the National 4-H Shooting Competition this 2018 Season.

San Juan County 4-H Air Rifle Team 2018

The San Juan County 4-H Air Rifle Team had an outstanding season this year. The air rifle team placed first at the state competition and qualified for nationals held in Grand Island, Nebraska. At nationals, they competed in three different air rifle events. The air rifle team placed first in the nation for silhouettes and they were runner-up champions overall.

One of the individuals on the team, Amoret McCartney, will be receiving a Junior Distinguished Badge from the Civilian Marksmanship Program after gaining excellence in competition points at the national competition.

The San Juan County 4-H Air Rifle Team didn’t just shoot remarkably but they also had outstanding sportsmanship. The team met a young lady from Florida shooting by herself and the San Juan team took her under their wing and made her a part of their team. They encouraged her just as they would any of their other teammates.

We are so proud of these young shooters and can’t wait to see their great strides in the future.

Thank you

We always appreciate the support of our donors, buyers and volunteers. Your contributions make this happen. If you would like information on grants offered by Four Corners SCI CLICK HERE.

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Recipient of Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship Announced

Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship

At our recent banquet fundraiser event, we proudly announced scholarship availability in the name of Tim Cooper, a former member and longtime supporter of our Mission. The Chapter is proud to offer funding to students who are pursuing and continuing education by way of college, university or trade school.

Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship
Tim Cooper loved life. He enjoyed nature, wildlife, and the pursuit of wild game. He displayed a jovial spirit as he recounted stories of pack strings, bighorn sheep, odds and results, his hunts, and his wife Paula’s hunts. He quarried others with a genuine interest in their pursuits. He respected other hunters and their success or lack of. He’s what more hunters need to emulate. A tragic car accident cut Tim’s life short. To honor him and because of his positive display toward wildlife, conservation, sharing it with others, and supporting his community, Four Corners SCI is proud to honor his legacy with the Tim Cooper Memorial scholarship, which will be awarded to students who also display these admirable qualities.

Tate Hinger – Scholarship Award Recipient

After reviewing scholarship applications, the Board of Directors is proud to announce that Tate Hinger, of Pagosa Springs Colorado, is the Chapter’s first recipient of the Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship.

Tate-Hinger-Tim-Cooper-Memorial-Scholarship-Award-Recipient-Four-Corners-SCI.png

“I plan to do everything in my power to preserve the wildlife, wilderness, and wonder I experienced as a kid. I hope to attend college and explore various professions where I could apply the leadership skills I’ve gained in life. As a hard-working, dedicated young man I know the value of the outdoors. It’s a gift that is too beautiful to hide and yet too precious to neglect.” Tate Hinger

In his scholarship application, Hinger shared many scholastic accomplishments, an extensive list of extracurricular activities, community service and remarkable essays. These items show his determination, drive and his support of our Mission.


This content originally appeared in the Summer, 2018 issue of the Four Corners SCI News. If you would like to be added to our mail or e-mail list, please CLICK HERE to send us your information.


Fantasies and Falsehoods – Media Attack On SCI

Media Attack On SCI Full Of Fantasies And Falsehoods


Safari Club International and hunters fight criminal poaching of wildlife resources. Anti-hunters do not.

Anti-hunters enable criminal poaching. By being aware of the problem and doing nothing about it, antis are responsible for the criminal slaughter of animals they falsely profess they want to save.

When it comes to saving wildlife in wild places, humans are either part of the problem or part of the solution. Anti-hunters are the problem. SCI and hunters are the solution.

Instead of putting their money where their mouth is and joining the fight against criminal wildlife poaching or pouring millions of dollars into meaningful conservation which actually helps save wildlife, anti-hunting elements within the eco-tourism industry attack SCI and hunting as they scurry to manufacture fake news surrounding a recent lion hunt in Africa.

Filled with fantasies and falsehoods, an article by Judy Malone published recently in the e-newspaper Daily Maverick lays bare efforts by the eco-colonialists within the eco-tourism industry to attack hunting, proclaiming it adversely affects the tourism that fills their coffers with cash.

Entitled “Driving nails into the coffin of Safari Club International,” the article attempts to justify its attack merely by terming hunting “morally wrong.”

hen, by focusing on reports of a recent lion hunt in Africa, the article leads to what obviously was the main reason for writing it in the first place – to further eco-tourism at the expense of hunting. It’s greed, pure and simple.

“The reality is that wildlife watching has the lion’s share of total tourism revenue in Africa and everywhere else,” the article stated. “So it is not only wildlife populations threatened by the killing of the biggest and best, but tourist numbers as well. Many are repelled and angered by the grisly details of hunts circulating in mainstream and social media.”

Yes, it is the perceived loss of revenue that drives this attack – an attack steeped in the parlance of traditional anti-hunting rhetoric. Bluntly, they don’t like hunting because they think it gets in the way of their making more money. Why are they not using their money to finance anti-poaching efforts and true conservation projects?

In the attack on SCI, the author assumes that the lion taken on a recent hunt is a particular male with a name – Skye. This assumption also has been echoed by mainline anti-hunting groups like Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society of the United State and Humane Society International.  Reports from Umbabat Private Nature Reserve (UPNR) indicate that this is simply not true.

The very premise of CBD, HSUS, HIS and the Daily Maverick article is false.  According to the Umbabat Private Nature Reserve (UPNR), the lion allegedly taken was not known as “Skye,” was not “the leader of the well-known western lion pride,’ and was not “declared a “High Value Pride Male.”  This lion, as documented by the June 12, 2018 statement from the UPNR, was “well past his prime – as per the hunting protocol,” “was not a pride lion,” “had worn down and broken teeth, a protruding spine (all signs of advanced age).”

Information about the specifics of the hunt are still coming in, which is far from surprising, considering that the hunt occurred fewer than 30 days ago.  CBD, HSUS, HSI and TATH wish to capitalize on the typical difficulties of obtaining information quickly about hunts in Africa and would like to fill the information vacuum with unsubstantiated allegations, innuendos and a media frenzy similar to the one that erroneously accused a U.S. hunter of illegally taking a now well-known lion in Zimbabwe.  Those false accusations and the turmoil that followed, through the damage done to sustainable use-hunting, have already done great harm to African wildlife conservation.

SCI and SCI Foundation, working with our members and chapter network, as well as our partners in other like-minded groups, have invested tens of millions of dollars into anti-poaching and conservation efforts around the world. Our unwavering dedication to protecting wildlife and habitat also extends into many levels of support for local people, expanding their economic opportunities.

Tragically, while the anti-hunters spend their time and money attacking hunting, criminal poachers are devastating entire wildlife populations. SCI and SCI Foundation have put planes in the air, trucks on the road and boots on the ground to stem the tide of the all-out assault on natural resources by criminal poachers. Anti-hunters have done none of this. They talk their talk. We walk our walk.

Working with universities, researchers and local experts, SCI and SCI Foundation empower those most negatively affected by poaching by providing viable alternatives for them to feed their families and improve their communities. Hunting works far beyond the hunt itself.

Compare the humanitarian and conservation successes of hunters with the political and economic greed of the organization represented by the author of the article in the Daily Maverick. About the author, the article states: “Judy Malone writes on behalf of Tourists Against Trophy Hunting.”

In the article, TATH is described: “Tourists Against Trophy Hunting (TATH) is an international lobbying coalition. We are conservationists, journalists, photographers, activists, tourism operators, and tourists, and through member connections reach a global audience in the millions.”

So, what we have here is a political lobbying operation that includes tourism operators wanting to rack-up profits. They are not actively fighting criminal poachers. SCI and hunters are.

As for driving any nails into the coffin of SCI, we are reminded of a quote by author Mark Twain after rumors of his death circulated while he was still alive: “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated,” he quipped.

So, too, are the fantasies of anti-hunting fake news items “exaggerated” that suggest SCI, as well as hunting, are dead. Dream on.


Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.

International Headquarters Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona · Ottawa, Canada
www.SafariClub.org

SCI Counters Anti-Hunter’s Lies at Federal Conservation Council

SCI Counters Antis’ Lies About Federal Commission

Safari Club International isn’t about to sit by idly as anti-hunters attack a federal conservation council and its members.


Anti-hunters never let facts get in the way of an emotionally-based false argument, as is evidenced in their attacks in the media on tomorrow’s meeting of the International Wildlife Conservation Council in Atlanta, GA.
“The shameful criticisms of the IWCC from the anti-hunting community are not surprising but are characteristically unfounded and disappointing,” said SCI President Paul Babaz. “Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has assembled an advisory group of individuals with scientific expertise and hands-on experience with the conservation strategies that are succeeding in Africa and elsewhere around the world.
“Not only is the hunting carried out by the members of the IWCC and their constituencies sustainable, but it has been recognized by scientific authorities around the world, including by the IUCN and CITES, as having a significant role in the conservation of many species.  It is time for the anti-hunters to grow-up and recognize that hunting has historically played and will continue to play an important part in international wildlife management and conservation,” Babaz stated.
Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.
International Headquarters Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona · Ottawa, Canada
www.SafariClub.org

Our Journeys and Yours | FOUR CORNERS SCI

Our Journeys and Yours was previously published as a Four Corners SCI Chapter newsletter. If you are not receiving the newsletters and would like to be added to the list, please let us know.

Headed to DC

Meet archery hunter, mentor, writer, husband, father and grandfather, Lew Webb. He is one of your Four Corners SCI Chapter Board Members and is an elected Director at Large for Safari Club International.

This month Lew is headed to Washington DC for the SCI Board of Director’s meeting. While he’s there, Lew will be visiting our legislators on Capitol Hill, as well as having many committee meetings and participating in Board elections.

What travels do you have this summer? Tag us on social media or email us pictures from your hunts, fishing trips, and other adventures. We’d enjoy featuring them in the future.

Send us an email at fourcornerssci@gmail.com.


Hunt Highlights 

2018 Banquet/Fundraiser item – Youth Turkey Hunt, presented by Dancing Pines Ranch. 

Hello Jon and Siri,

I want to thank you for supporting the Four Corners SCI Chapter by donating a youth turkey hunt for the Spring of 2018. We were very fortunate to get the winning bid for the Dancing Pines Ranch Youth Turkey Hunt. I could not be any more pleased with our overall experience. They were very accommodating, friendly, knowledgeable, and genuinely interested in the success of my son Tyler (14-years-old) and my daughter Maci (11-years-old).

We were able to hunt a total of four days. With the high number of turkeys and excellent habitat, we had shooting opportunities each day. On the first evening, we got to the ranch, and we counted over thirty turkeys in one group.

The first day of our hunt we saw tons of turkeys and probably heard over 100 gobbles. Maci got a shot at a nice tom at around 10 yards from the blind but missed. She was very excited, and this was her first hunt ever with a shotgun. Her prior hunting experience consisted of shooting prairie dogs with a .22 Long-Rifle.

The second day of our hunt, Tyler and I set up under a large pine tree, and early that morning we had a tom with a few hens come in, but they stayed just out of range. He ended up shooting a nice tom at about 35 yards later that morning.

The third day Maci and I set up in one blind and Tyler went across the field to another blind. He could see turkeys coming toward us before we could, and we had a good time signaling back and forth. “Three turkeys coming in at 11’oclock.” I said to Maci. We had a strutting tom at about 25 yards late that afternoon but decided not to take the shot. She was not comfortable shooting through the fence. Meanwhile, at the blind Tyler was in, there were over 10 toms and jakes right next to his blind, and they stayed there for over an hour. Of course, luck would have it that these birds would stick next to the blind where the tag was already filled.

On the fourth and final morning of our hunt, Maci and I set up under a tree in a meadow and put out a hen decoy, and began calling. A single tom came right to us. He stopped at 30 yards, and I told Maci to wait until he was just a little closer. He got about 20 yards from us but never stopped. He had come in so quickly that we never got completely set up and ready to shoot. I tried to stop him, but he just walked a little faster.

That afternoon, we rode around with Jon, the ranch owner, in the ranger looking for turkeys. We saw turkeys everywhere we went, but they were always one step ahead of us. We never got an opportunity to set up for a shot. I think Maci enjoyed riding with Jon about as much as any part of the hunt.

Thanks again for providing an opportunity to hunt turkey on Dancing Pines Ranch. I really enjoyed the time spent with both of my kids, and the number of turkeys we saw was incredible. We had a great time. THANK YOU!!!!

Jeff Barnes

MARK YOUR CALENDARS. NEXT YEAR’S BANQUET DATE – SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2019

 


Honoring Lady Anglers and Hunters #InternationalWomensDay

It’s no secret that Four Corners SCI honors women. Today we salute you, lady anglers and hunters. We’d like to see and share your fishing and hunting pictures on our Facebook Page. Tag us or share them!

Check out these ladies who have already been on some of the trips we’ll auction in 9 days!!!

International Women's Day

#InternationalWomensDay

2018 Hunt Preview

SCI TICKET BUTTON


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