Hunting Application Deadline New Mexico – Bear and Turkey

Deadline to apply for bear and turkey permits is Wednesday

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – The deadline to apply for 2019-2020 bear and turkey permits is 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13. Draw results will be available Feb. 27. 2019-2020 rules and information booklets can be found on the Department of Game and Fish website.

Hunters can apply online, by telephone or in person at department offices. For more information or help in applying for the draw, please call the information center at (888) 248-6866.

Successful applicants must purchase a 2019 bear or turkey license with applicable stamp(s) after March 25.

Draw permits may not be printed before the bear or turkey license is purchased.

The draw deadline for big game, including elk, deer, pronghorn antelope, Barbary and bighorn sheep, oryx, ibex and javelina is 5 p.m. March 20.

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All outreach, grants, scholarship, awards, and other means of support are done in accordance with our Mission Statement.

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Outreach and Support

Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship

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Four Corners Chapter SCI
MISSION STATEMENT

To promote good fellowship among all who love the outdoors and hunting.

To promote conservation of the world’s renewable wildlife resources, recognizing hunting as one of the many management tools.

To educate youth, sportsmen, and the public in conservation of our wildlife and our forest, which is our natural heritage.

To share our knowledge and hunting experiences among all our membership.

To operate the association as a non-profit organization, consistent with its charitable purposes, while providing enjoyment for our members.  Always with the goal of helping to conserve the animals that we love to hunt today, for those who will come to love the sport tomorrow.

We support our mission through our fundraising efforts and providing grant donations. Our annual banquet/fundraiser is the primary source of funds. All monies collected go toward our efforts. The good news is 70% of all funds raised stay here. That’s right the majority of our efforts stay local. If you or someone you know have a group which would like to apply for a grant, please submit your application to the address below.

Submit all inquiries to:

Four Corners SCI
PO Box 1401
Bayfield, CO 81122 


Passing of Congressman/Sportsman John Dingell of Dingle-Johnson Act

We as outdoor enthusiasts, wildlife lovers, volunteers, and hunters need to take a moment to remember Congressman John Dingell and all he did for us. Strive to encourage your representatives to take the initiative to support our passions to ensure they exist for future generations.

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Safari Club International Statement on the Passing of Congressman John Dingell

SCI first for hunters logoJohn Dingell, Jr. of Michigan served in the U.S. House of Representatives from his first election in 1955 until 2015—an incredible six decades—making him the longest serving Member of Congress in U.S. history.

Throughout his life and Congressional service, Dingell was an avid sportsman and friend to America’s hunters.

SCI President Paul Babaz observed, “I learned of his passing last night and was reminded of the many accomplishments of this great man and the debt we, as hunters, owe him.  The sportsmen and women of America lost a titan in our community.”

Dingell served as a member and chairman of the powerful Energy & Commerce where he a championed hunting and defended the Second Amendment, serving on the NRA board of directors for several years.

Known as “The Chairman” by friends and foes alike, Dingell served in the House for 59 years and 22 days, casting 28,551 votes, according to the House historian.

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Dingell was at the forefront of supporting legislation that impacted wildlife conservation.  The Dingell-Johnson Act, which provides financial assistance for state fish restoration and management is just one example of Dingell’s dedication to wildlife management.

In recognition of his tireless work on behalf of hunters, SCI awarded Chairman Dingell with both its prestigious Legislator of The Year Award and Heritage award.

“I want to extend the condolences of SCI’s members and my personal condolences to Chairman Dingell’s widow, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, and to his family and friends,” said Paul Babaz.  “We have truly lost a great leader in the hunting world.”


Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.

International Headquarters · Washington, DC
www.SafariClub.org


FOUR CORNERS CHAPTER SCI MISSION STATEMENT

To promote good fellowship among all who love the outdoors and hunting.

To promote conservation of the world’s renewable wildlife resources, recognizing hunting as one of the many management tools.

To educate youth, sportsmen, and the public in conservation of our wildlife and our forest, which is our natural heritage.

To share our knowledge and hunting experiences among all our membership.

To operate the association as a non-profit organization, consistent with its charitable purposes, while providing enjoyment for our members. Always with the goal of helping to conserve the animals that we love to hunt today, for those who will come to love the sport tomorrow.


Outreach and Support

70% of Funds Raised Stay Local

Tim Cooper Memorial Scholarship

Scholarship for College, University, or Trade Schools

Legacy Project-Four Corners SCI

Sharing the Outdoors with Future Generations

 


David Bernhardt Selected as Secretary Of Interior

We look forward to seeing this outdoorsman work toward all things good for wildlife, habitat, outdoorsmen, and our country.

President Trump Taps David Bernhardt For Secretary Of InteriorTitle

SCI first for hunters logoPresident Donald Trump has selected acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt as a permanent replacement for former Secretary Ryan Zinke.

In a tweet Monday announcing his decision, the President said: “David has done a fantastic job from the day he arrived, and we look forward to having his nomination officially confirmed!”

“It’s a humbling privilege to be nominated to lead a Department whose mission I love, to accomplish the balanced, common sense vision of our President,” Bernhardt said in a statement.

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“Safari Club International adds its congratulations to David Bernhardt,” said SCI President Paul Babaz. “I personally look forward to working closely with him as a member of the International Wildlife Conservation Council and wish David the best of luck as he enters this new phase in his career.”

Support for Bernhardt has poured in from key Congressional leaders and outside groups that have worked with Bernhardt during both his stint at Interior and throughout his career.

“It’s a brilliant move,” said Rep. Rob Bishop of Utah, the ranking GOP member of the House Natural Resources Committee. “No one is more experienced, and I look forward to working with him.”

Bernhardt is an avid outdoorsman with years of experience managing fish and wildlife resources.


Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.

International Headquarters Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona · Ottawa, Canada
www.SafariClub.org

Mountain Lion Attack – Colorado

We’ve been following Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s reports regarding a mountain lion who attacked trail-runner. In the report, we’ve learned that the mountain lion attacked the runner from behind and that the runner made it to the hospital for care for his injuries. CPW indicates that they’re doing a necropsy on the lion. What we do not know is what the runner used in self-defense, if the cat is deceased due to the hiker’s defense or if CPW put it down. We’ll share additional reports if we see them.

CPW and Larimer County investigating mountain lion attack at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space

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LARIMER COUNTY, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers, working with Larimer County Department of Natural Resources, are investigating a mountain lion attack on a trail runner using the West Ridge Trail at Horsetooth Mountain Open Space on Monday, Feb. 4. The victim was able to defend himself from the attack, resulting in the death of the juvenile mountain lion. The runner was then able to leave the open space property and get himself to a local hospital.

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“Mountain lion attacks are not common in Colorado and it is unfortunate that the lion’s hunting instincts were triggered by the runner,” Ty Petersburg, area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife said. “This could have had a very different outcome.”

The victim of the attack described hearing something behind him on the trail and was attacked by a mountain lion as he turned around to investigate. The lion lunged at the runner, biting his face and wrist. He was able to fight and break free from the lion, killing the lion in self-defense. The runner sustained serious, but non-life threatening injuries as a result of the attack.

As wildlife officers searched the trail area provided by the runner, the body of a juvenile mountain lion was found within feet of several possessions that the victim asked the officers to look for on the trail. The lion has been taken to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife animal health lab for a necropsy.

“The runner did everything he could to save his life. In the event of a lion attack you need to do anything in your power to fight back just as this gentleman did,” said Mark Leslie, Colorado Parks and Wildlife Northeast Region manager.

Mountain lion attacks on people are rare, with fewer than 20 fatalities in North America in more than 100 years. Since 1990, Colorado has had 16 injuries as a result of mountain lion attacks, and three fatalities. Lion populations are doing very well in Colorado, but they are elusive animals and tend to avoid humans. Most people will never see a lion in the wild, but they are there. If you live, work, or play in mountain lion country, it is important to be alert.

What to do if you encounter a mountain lion:

  • Do not approach a lion, especially one that is feeding or with kittens. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Stay calm when you come upon a lion. Talk calmly and firmly to it. Move slowly and never turn your back on it.
  • Stop or back away slowly, if you can do it safely. Running may stimulate a lion’s instinct to chase and attack. Face the lion and stand upright.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you’re wearing one. If you have small children with you, protect them by picking them up so they won’t panic and run.
  • If the lion behaves aggressively, throw stones, branches or whatever you can get your hands on without crouching down or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly. What you want to do is convince the lion you are not prey and that you may in fact be a danger to the lion.
  • Fight back if a lion attacks you. Lions have been driven away by prey that fights back. People have fought back with rocks, sticks, caps or jackets, garden tools andtheir bare hands successfully. We recommend targeting the eyes and nose as these are sensitive areas. Remain standing or try to get back up!

Respecting wildlife includes being informed on how to avoid or manage wildlife encounters. To learn more about living with wildlife in Colorado, visit cpw.state.co.us.


Event Invite – 4 Corners 3D Archery Shoot

We’re a busy group, hosting multiple events, over here at the Four Corners Chapter. Our Annual Banquet/Fundraiser will be here on March 16th, but turkey hunting season is just around the corner so we want you to get prepared. We’re hosing another 4 Corners 3D Archery Shoot on Saturday, April 6th. Follow our Facebook page for updates and additional information. Come have some fun with us!

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WHAT: 4 Corners 3D Archery Shoot
WHEN: Saturday, April 6th, 2019
WHERE: Goods for the Woods 3D Archery range, 24720 Road K3, Cortez, CO.

Games, Prizes and Awards.

8:00 am Registration
9:30 am Shotgun Start
1:00 Lunch & Awards
$20.00 Entry

Classes:
Men’s Pro
Men’s Hunter
Youth 12-years-old and under
Men’s and women’s compound
Men’s and women’s traditional

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Bag Program Moves Forward in Africa

We had a chance to chat with Larry Bell about his family’s foundation and the Blue Bag Program while we were at SCI, Reno. The family’s story, of the loss of their daughter, is a tragic one, however, what they’ve created is an inspiration.

New Partnership with International Wildlife Fellowship Foundation Moves Bell Family Blue Bag Program Forward in Africa

SCI-foundation SCIFSCI Foundation is proud to announce a new partnership between our Foundation, the Ellen and Larry Bell Family, and the International Wildlife Fellowship Foundation (IWFF) aimed at helping those in need in Africa through an expansion of the successful Safari-Care Bell Family Blue Bag program. This new partnership provides Blue Bags and funding for IWFF to purchase and distribute items that will aid in the humanitarian relief and social responsibility efforts for needy individuals in Africa. The funds were provided by SCI Foundation from a special grant provided by the Bell Family.

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“Working with like-minded groups like IWFF greatly expands our ability to reach those in need around the world,” said SCI Foundation president Bob Benson. “By supporting local communities and helping to meet their humanitarian needs, we hope to further our conservation mission by helping to alleviate some of the pressures facing wildlife in some of the poorest areas of Africa. If wildlife is to survive, the people living in these areas must see a benefit. We’re hoping, with IWFF’s help, to provide that benefit.”

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IWFF’s efforts distributing their Bell Family Blue Bags have been impressive. Since December, Blue Bags containing items like food, clothing, toys and other supplies have been delivered to many places including a Macacasa Village where 120 very poor people live; a foster home where 7 children from terrible conditions now live in a safe and happy home; and to Grace House Shelter for the Homeless in Krugersdorp where 55 adults and 10 small children live.image

Through their program, numerous Blue Bag deliveries have also been made to local schools including the Booysens Beertjies Nursery School in Pretoria where 100 small children from a very poor community attend school as well as to the Mangalana Community Schools in Mozambique where many of these children only eat at school, as there is no food in their homes. IWFF supports schools like these through the delivery of Blue Bags containing food, clothing and supplies, so that the children can learn English and get a good education, so that they can find jobs and do not have to turn to poaching to make a living.

Also supported through deliveries of meat, groceries, cleaning materials and clothing via Blue Bags have been the Kungwini Centre where 200 physically and mentally challenged adults and 30 children live and the Elandspoort Child Welfare Centre, where 65 kids from a very poor community come to do their homework after school and to enjoy to what most of them is their only meal of the day. To many of these children, which come from the poorest of families, going to an orphanage where they would receive three meals a day and sleep in a warm bed sounds like going on holiday.image

IWFF’s Little Feet Project works to help meet the medical and other needs of children born with club feet like two little boys from a very poor area of Booysens taken away from their parents because of neglect and abuse, which now live in a foster house with five other children that IWFF also supports. IWFF organized for their feet to be fixed by a doctor and Blue Bags were delivered to help with food, clothing and medication for the two boys during their recovery.

“We are very grateful for the partnership between ourselves, SCI Foundation, the Bell Family and Amy Bell Charities,” said IWFF CEO Retha van der Merwe. “This partnership has made a huge difference towards the life changing projects that we aim to do, thereby showing that hunters do care.”

In addition to its humanitarian work, IWFF also directly supports several African-based conservation efforts including the VULPRO Vulture Sanctuary, a rescue center where Vultures poisoned or shocked by electric fencing or wires are rescued, healed and released into nature, and LET IT SWIM at the Josini Dam, an anti-poaching project that looks to stop southern/common reedbuck from being poached and tiger fish from being illegally netted greatly affecting angling-based tourism and the economics of the area, which is the largest and one of a very few places in South Africa where the iconic tiger fish species breed and occur naturally.

Together, we are working to make a real, tangible difference on the ground in Africa. Partnerships like this one greatly expand the reach of much-needed humanitarian programs like the Safari-Care Bell Family Blue Bag program, providing relief and alternatives to poaching and illegal hunting and trapping, supporting wildlife conservation efforts where it matters most. We thank the Bell Family for their generous support and IWFF for their ongoing commitment to helping those in need across Africa.

To learn more about this and other SCI Foundation Humanitarian Services projects, visit SafariClubFoundation.org. To learn more about IWFF, feel free to contact Retha van der Merwe at ceo@iwff.co.za.

CLICK HERE To support this and other SCI Foundation programs, make a donation today.

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Give Your Opinions on Big Game Structures | Colorado

Big game hunting meeting in Durango, Feb. 6 

CPW_SiteLogoDURANGO, Colo. — Colorado Parks and Wildlife invites hunters and anglers to give their ideas and opinions about wildlife issues and the new big game season structure at a meeting, 6-8:30 p.m., Feb. 6 in the Eulos Room at the Durango Recreation Center, 2700 Main Ave.

In the first part of the meeting, local wildlife managers will give an overview of wildlife related issues. The remainder of the meeting will include a presentation and discussion of the big game season structure.  Every five years CPW evaluates all big-game hunting seasons and asks hunters for their opinions on if changes are needed. The new structure will be in effect for the 2020-2024 seasons.

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The meeting is also part of the ongoing statewide “Sportsmen’s Roundtable” process set up by CPW to assure that hunters, anglers and everyone who cares about wildlife can provide input and discuss issues with leaders of the agency.

Wildlife managers will explain the process of evaluating the big-game seasons and how the seasons are currently arranged. A brief survey will be conducted at the meeting, so participants are asked to bring their smart phones.

Hunters are also asked to complete an on-line survey that is being used to gather information: https://www.research.net/r/8MQNS3F. The deadline to make comments on the big game season structure is Feb. 11.

For more information, call Joe Lewandowski at 970-375-6708; or by e-mail at joe.lewandowski@state.co.us.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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