Category Archives: Uncategorized

A Sheep On Every Mountain

WOW! You all have to read this courageous story of the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s work to restore Desert Big Horn Sheep to their native habitats.

Hunt Forever

AZ Game & Fish Commission Chairman, Edward “Pat” Madden (center), AZ Game & Fish Commissioner Eric Sparks (right) and Special Assistant to the Director, Kent Komadina (left)

It’s before dawn and four of us are in a truck bouncing along a potholed road headed out to a remote location for a hunt. The atmosphere is friendly, good-natured ribbing and talk of past successes and failures in the field. It’s deer season in Arizona and scenes very much like this are being played out all over the state, this one however is decidedly different. For one thing, the other three in the truck are AZ Game and Fish Department Commission Chairman Edward “Pat” Madden, Game and Fish Commissioner Eric Sparks and Special Assistant to the Director, Kent Komadina. We are not on our way to fill a deer tag but to fill the capture crates following us with desert bighorn sheep…

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San Juan County 4-H Team Receives Four Corners SCI Support

At Four Corners SCI we are proud to host one of the largest fundraisers in the area and to give back to the community. A piece of our Mission Statement is “To educate youth, sportsmen, and the public in conservation of our wildlife and our forest, which is our natural heritage.” We’re putting forth more than one effort in this avenue and will be sharing additional works throughout the year. Please find a recap from the San Juan County 4-H Shooting Team. They recently participated in the 4-H National event, a trip for which our Chapter provided support.
The 2017 4-H National Shooting Sports Championships were held in Grand Island, Nebraska and it was a blast!! 22 teams across the country competed in .22 rifle and 26 team competed in air rifle. The competition was fierce!

The Air Rifle Team (Gabe Doherty, Racine Eavenson, Camron Martinez, and Bethany Parks) didn’t make it to the podium but there was some personal best scores shot!


The .22 team (Rashel Korte, Michaela Langlitz, Amoret McCartney, and Jeana Dolan) came in 4th in the Silhouette event with Michaela Langlitz coming 10th as an individual.
In the CMP Rimfire event the team came in 4th and Michaela Langlitz came in 7th as an individual.
In the 3P event the team placed 3rd with Amoret McCartney placing 9th with her individual score.
For the overall team award the San Juan County .22 team ranked 4th in the Nation with Rashel Korte ranking 9th overall

Wow, what a week! Very proud of our teams and very blessed to be part of the event and experience it with the families that we were with. Great Memories, Thanks! Thank you again for all donations and support  to make it possible for these 4-H families to go experience an event like this.
Many thanks to our members and all supporters who contribute and support our Mission. We are very proud of these youngsters and their hard work.

Olivia Opre on the Anti-Hunting Movement and What We Can Do

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Olivia Opre on the Anti-Hunting Movement and What We Can Do…

As hunters, we face many challenges in the field: weather, migrations, moon phases, terrain and sometimes plain old bad luck. But, with the onset of social media, our challenges in protecting our hunting traditions have moved into our living rooms and increased exponentially. Social media has allowed anti-hunters to claim an identity otherwise too daunting to embrace, while hiding in the safety of their home behind a computer. As their confidence is gained and their true character is revealed, they become more brazen in making ignorant accusations and spewing vitriol that hurts us as individuals and as hunters.

Many of us fear jeopardizing the safety of ourselves, family and our careers; subsequently, we retract by becoming extremely private and oftentimes avoid engaging in any sort of communication on a social media platform. Where this is completely understandable, there are some of us willing and capable of taking on the fight. To those of you free to embrace this battle, there are things we all need to be on the same page about… starting with a similar message based in good science and facts. Hunting is conservation, and we need to be constantly driving this point home to ensure that it is heard.

As hunters, we also need to be cognizant on how we portray ourselves and the use of trigger words like ‘trophy’, ‘record’, etc., so as not to end the argument before it starts. Additionally, the tastefulness of photos we post often sets the stage for reaction. Finding common ground can be a huge help; for instance, most people appreciate the locally sourced food movement and everyone hates poachers.

The future of our traditions depends upon reaching those on the fence about hunting and in educating our youth… the same people who actively engage on social media. Together, we can share all of the facts and create a more positive public image of hunters and hunting.

I support SCI Foundation and you should too. Stand with us to support science-based conservation and education.

Yours in Conservation,

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Olivia Opre

Hunter, 2014 SCI Diana Award Recipient, Conservationist, and co-host of “Eye of the Hunter”

SCI FOUNDATION is stepping up its fight against “False News” and “Alternative Facts,” and we need your support to make a difference.

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(click above image to learn more)

DONATE TODAY AND DOUBLE YOUR IMPACT!

A generous SCI member and Foundation donor has challenged us to raise more funds for the mission by offering to match the first $25,000 raised. In turn… we are now challenging you to “Double the Impact” of your gift to support wildlife conservation by participating in this limited time charitable giving opportunity.

To learn about more giving options, contact Kimberly Byers at 520-620-1220 ext. 322 or kbyers@safariclub.org


Delta Airlines: New Requirements for Carrying Firearms in Checked Luggage

Delta Airlines: New Requirements for Carrying Firearms in Checked Luggage

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SCI has just learned that Delta Airlines recently adopted some new procedures for passengers who carry firearms in their checked luggage.  Checked bags containing firearms will receive special tags.  These tags are intended to alert baggage handlers not to put the bags carrying firearms on carousels with other types of luggage.  Instead the checked bags containing the firearms will go directly to a baggage service agent.  According to news articles on the changes, (1) owners will be required to show proof of identification to pick up their luggage; (2) the baggage service agent will use zip ties to secure the bag before releasing the bag to its owner; and (3) at least at some airports, a police officer will be at the location when the passenger picks up the baggage.

The full text of Delta’s procedure for traveling with firearms in checked luggage is below:

Shooting Equipment

Shooting equipment is allowed as checked baggage only. It must fit within the very specific criteria that we outline below.

  • Declare to the Delta representative that you are checking a firearm.
  • Declare the existence of a firearm to security personnel if there’s a security checkpoint before the Delta counter.
  • All firearms must be declared by the passenger to a Delta representative at the main ticket counter.
  • Present firearm(s) unloaded and sign a “Firearms Unloaded” declaration.
  • Firearms must be packed in a locked manufacturer’s hard-sided container specifically designed for the firearm, a locked hard–sided gun case or a locked hard-sided piece of luggage. Handguns may be packed in a locked hard-sided gun case, and then packed inside an unlocked soft-sided piece of luggage. However, a Conditional Acceptance Tag must be used in this case.
  • Maintain entry permits in your possession for the country or countries of destination or transit.
  • Ensure small arms ammunition is packed in the manufacturer’s original package or securely packed in fiber, wood, plastic or metal boxes and provide separation for cartridges.
  • You are responsible for knowledge of and compliance with all Federal, State or local laws regarding the possession and transportation of firearms. For more information about this regulation you can visit the TSA website.
  • If you are transporting a firearm to the United Kingdom, a permit from the United Kingdom is specifically required. You must contact the United Kingdom for more information about securing this permit.
  • Until further advised, passengers departing Brussels, Belgium are not allowed to check weapons including, antique, sporting, hunting or toy rifles in their checked baggage.
  • All firearms checked as baggage must be picked up at the Baggage Service Office upon arrival.

The following types of ammunition are not accepted:

  • Gun powder; such as Pyrodex or Black Powder
  • Ammunition with explosive or incendiary projectiles
  • Ammunition, including case, exceeding 11 pounds (5 kg) gross weight per passenger

Pistols and accessories must be included in one case and contain:

  • Pistol telescopes
  • Noise suppressors
  • A small pistol tool case
  • No more than 11 lbs. (5 kg) of ammunition, including case

Rifles and shotguns must be packaged as follows:

  • One hard sided case containing up to four rifles, shotguns, shooting materials, tools
  • The case must completely secure the firearm from being accessed. All areas designed to be locked must be locked.
  • Locked cases that can be easily opened are not permitted. Be aware that the container the firearm was in when purchased may not adequately secure the firearm when it is transported in checked baggage.
  • One hard sided case containing up to five handguns, one scope, tools
  • One bow and quiver of arrows and maintenance kit enclosed in a case or container strong enough to protect the bow and quiver from accidental damage
  • No more than 11 lbs. (5 kg) of ammunition, including case

An excess baggage fee will apply if checking more than one gun case.

These instructions can he found on Delta’s website, found under “Sports Equipment,” then “Shooting Equipment,” here:  http://www.delta.com/content/www/en_US/traveling-with-us/baggage/before-your-trip/special-items.html (emphasis highlighted).

To SCI’s knowledge, the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) has not issued any requirement for any airline to adopt all of these same procedures, although TSA does impose some similar requirements, https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition.  While all airlines regulate the carriage of firearms in checked bags, SCI is not aware of any other airline requiring customers to pick up luggage containing firearms at a special location, using zip ties to secure such luggage, or having law enforcement at the special baggage office.


Entering the bear den: CPW concludes study on human-bear interaction

To our members, followers and supporters. Here is a conclusion and update to a Colorado Parks and Wildlife bear study, here in Durango. This is just one organization who has received support from Four Corners SCI via grant money.

Colorado Outdoors Online

CPW-durango-bear-research-37 CPW Researcher Heather Johnson. Photo by Nora Logue/CPW.

On a sunny March day, a group of eight crouch silently outside a bear den dug into a ridge near Durango as Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Heather Johnson literally pokes the sleeping mama bear inside.

This expedition is part of the conclusion of a first-of-its-kind study conducted over six years in southwest Colorado. It is one of the most comprehensive studies to date on human-bear interactions and the impact of urbanization on bear populations.

“This study was motivated by the increase that’s happened in human-bear conflicts in Colorado. As the state wildlife agency that manages those conflicts, we wanted to better understand what was causing those conflicts to increase, and ultimately what we should do about it,” said Johnson, a wildlife researcher.

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Resolution to Overturn Federal Rule on Wildlife Management Passes Senate

Yesterday, the U.S. Senate approved House Joint Resolution 69 with a vote of 52 to 47. This legislation previously passed the House with a bipartisan vote of 225 to 193.

If signed by the President, H.J. Res 69 would nullify the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) rule, “Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska.” Please contact President Trump today and urge him to sign H.J. Res. 69 into law immediately!

The FWS rule prohibited forms of hunting on all National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska and interfered with Alaska’s ability to manage wildlife within its borders.

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SCI has led the hunting community in challenging the FWS rule and in fighting for state authority over the management of fish and wildlife and the regulation of hunting, including by filing a lawsuit to challenge the FWS rule and similar regulations adopted by the National Park Service for National Preserves in Alaska.

SCI celebrates the Senate approval of H.J. Res. 69, together with Alaska’s legislative leaders, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the Alaska Board of Game and the numerous sportsmen’s organizations who aggressively pursued this Congressional nullification of the FWS rule.

While a final victory is close, our work is not yet done.  H.J. Res. 69 now heads to the President’s desk. Please contact President Trump and urge him to sign H.J. Res. 69 into law.


Canada Black Bear Hunt to be Auctioned at Four Corners SCI Banquet

BEAR HUNTING with Silver Fox Outfitters in High Level, Alberta, Canada. Two hunters may hunt for three days. This event includes one bear each (license fees not included) and the hunter may add a bear tag and upgrade to a five day hunt. Also available is a WOLF hunt addition. Meals and outfitter tent accommodations are included. This hunt is for spring of 2015.

The Silver Fox Outfitters “two tag” hunters have averaged more then a150% shooting rate for close to a decade. This is one of the highest success rates in the province. We manage this by: regulating the number of hunters we take, using fresh quality bait hauled to the hunting area in our own reefer trailer, setting strategically located baits, and by insuring that our guides know the area we hunt. Our past success rate speak for itself and when compared to the possibly less than 50% hunter success in other provinces/states, it’s easy to see that Alberta is the place to be for fantastic bear hunting. Eric Rauhanen and the Silver Fox Outfitters “team” are the right choice for you.

THE BEARS

Our area has one of the highest trophy bear populations in North America with about 10 to 15% being color phased. Light hunting pressure allows us to produce a higher percentage of larger, older boars for our hunters. This is representative of a mature population. Bears are so plentiful here that each hunter is allowed two tags.

LG_and_Mia_Anstine_wearing_Lady_Hunter_Safety_System_saety_harness_and_Prois_lady_hunting_apparellBAIT HUNTING

We use beavers, butcher scraps, bakery scraps, restaurant grease, oats, molasses and specialty bear lures for bait and it’s hauled to site and stored in a 28 ft reefer trailer. Our baits are set when there’s still snow on the ground, several weeks before your arrival. Maintained regularly they become the bear’s primary food source. Baits are accessible by four-wheel drive trucks, all-terrain vehicles or jet boat. As nocturnal animals, bears are hunted primarily in the evening. Hunters are taken to active bait sites in the late afternoon. Portable tree stands are the preferred method in our area. They are 12 to 15 feet up and 15 to 20 yards from the bait. We are quite far north and the sunsets late. We are normally finished hunting by 10:30 p.m. and out of the bush by midnight.

SPOT & STALK

Few things can compare to the excitement of stalking trophy bears. We offer both five day as well as the recommended ten day hunt. They are normally restricted to one hunter per guide to ensure a maximum number of opportunities at quality bears. Highly mobile spike camps are utilized, allowing the hunter to instantly move to where the game is and to cover more ground. Hunters that have spot and stalk hunted know that nothing compares to taking a trophy bruin from the ground.

Silver-Fox-Outfitters-trophy-black-bear-Canada-photo-by-Mia-AnstineBAG LIMIT

We hunt a two-bear area; each tag can be purchased individually. Your second tag can be purchased optionally at any time during your hunt. We have crippled bear policy re: it cost you a tag.

WHAT TO BRING

Hunters are responsible for their own personal equipment. A complete and detailed list is sent several weeks before your arrival, or I can e-mail you now if you’d like. It will include such items as: a camera with lots of memory, warm quiet clothing, rain gear, rubber boots, sleeping bag and personal effects. For entry into Canada you need a passport.


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