Category Archives: Legislation

New Mexico Hunters and Trappers – Director to Hear Comments

Director to hear public comments on trapping rule

ALBUQUERQUE – The Director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish will hold a listening session to hear public comments on proposed changes to the furbearer rule. Proposed changes include mandatory trapper education, increasing set-back requirements, allowance for closure of areas to trapping, signage and further clarifying the definition of a trail.

The listening session will be conducted 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 27 at the department’s Northwest Regional Office, 7816 Alamo Road NW in Albuquerque.

Comments can be provided by mail: New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, Attn: Furbearer Rule Development, P.O. Box 25112, Santa Fe, NM 87504; by email, ispa@state.nm.us, or in person at the meeting.


States Working to Gain Control of Wolf Management

Thank you for your hard work in contacting your legislators aboutH.R. 6784, the Manage Our Wolves Act. It has passed the House. It is now time to contact your Senators!

Wolf De-Listing Bill A Win For Hunters

The U.S. House of Representatives today approved a bill that returns wolf management to states and is a step toward fixing flaws in the Endangered Species Act – something Safari Club International, on behalf of all hunters, has championed for years.

H.R. 6784, the Manage Our Wolves Act, was introduced in September by Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI).  The bill was approved 196-180 and secured bipartisan support from nine Democrats and 187 Republicans.

Passage of the Manage Our Wolves Act will return management of the Western Great Lakes gray wolf population to the states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.  The bill will also ensure that Wyoming’s gray wolf management remains under state authority and will direct the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to delist the remaining gray wolves of the lower 48 states, with the exception of Mexican wolves.

SCI President Paul Babaz was quick to praise the win on the House floor.

“First, thanks to Rep. Sean Duffy and so many other supportive Members of Congress for highlighting the critical need to recognize that recovery must lead to de-listing,” SCI President Babaz said.  “Second, this is a tremendous victory for hunters, wildlife conservation in general, and State wildlife managers.  All of them have played significant roles recovering gray wolf populations.”

While wolf recovery successes have been continually thwarted or ignored by courts acting on the many ambiguities or flaws in the wording of the ESA, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service states on its website: “the gray wolf has rebounded from the brink of extinction to exceed population targets by as much as 300 percent.  Today, there are estimated to be 5,691 gray wolves in the contiguous United States.  Wolf numbers continue to be robust, stable and self-sustaining.”

The recovery of the gray wolf is a success story and H.R. 6784 will help correctly transfer their management to the professionals at the state wildlife management agencies—the primary managers of our nation’s fish and wildlife resources.

“I’m very proud SCI has been a leader in ESA litigation efforts over so many years to help support wolf delisting,” SCI President Babaz added.  “Today’s win in Congress is an opportunity for federal legislators to clear away ESA’s roadblocks and enact laws to recognize easily documentable recovery efforts and restore State wildlife management authority.”

Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.
International Headquarters · Washington, DC
www.SafariClub.org

California Governor’s Veto on Anti-Hunting Proposal

Hunters across the country often watch and laugh at the surge in California’s anti-hunting rules. It’s important to pay attention to what goes on in the Golden State because it often paves the way for what is to come in other states. We have to stay in tune with what legislation is proposed and passed throughout the nation in order to preserve our hunting heritage.
Big Win For Hunters: CA Governor Vetoes Anti-Hunting Proposal

California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. vetoed a bill that would have prevented hunters from possessing and in some cases importing the named African species in the bill, including parts and products, lawfully harvested in Africa.

“Safari Club International recognizes California Governor Jerry Brown for vetoing Senate Bill 1487, legislation that would prohibit the people of California from importing and possessing several species legally hunted in countries in Africa,” said SCI President Paul Babaz. “SCI also applauds the sportsmen and women who voiced their opposition to Governor Brown. Without your phone calls and support, this misguided piece of legislation might have been signed into law. SCI also thanks the California Coalition for spearheading the months-long effort to stop this anti-hunting bill.”

The bill targeted elephants, lions, leopards, rhinos and an additional six species – some of which are neither listed on the Endangered Species Act’s endangered/threatened lists or CITES Appendices I or II.

The authors of the bill relied on emotion rather than science to craft anti-hunting restrictions, which were neither necessary nor remotely beneficial for the species identified in SB 1487.

The bill would have discouraged Californians from legally hunting outside the U.S. and participating in the community-based conservation efforts that are succeeding in Africa.

SCI works with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and participates in international treaties like CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) to ensure that regulatory decisions related to trade in wildlife, including hunting trophies, are based on sound science rather than emotion.

This veto is a significant setback for anti-hunting legislators and a great win for hunters throughout the country. SCI continues to work with other hunting/conservation groups and state legislatures to prevent passage of restrictive laws and policies that are detrimental to hunters and wildlife conservation.


Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.

International Headquarters Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona · Ottawa, Canada
www.SafariClub.org

Public Invited to Regional CPW Meeting

Colorado Parks and Wildlife for a Sportsmen’s Roundtable video conference.

When –

Thursday, February 1 from 6-8 p.m.

Topics:

  • Hermosa Creek native cutthroat trout project
  • Bear activity last summer
  • Shed antler regulations
  • Legislative update
  • Chronic wasting disease issues

Office locations:

  • Gunnison, 300 W. New York Ave.
  • Monte Vista, 0722 S Road 1 East; Montrose, 2300 S. Townsend Ave. (U.S. Highway 550)
  • Durango, 415 Turner Drive in Bodo Park.

Latest Version of the Sportsmen’s Act

Senate Committee Launches Latest Version of the Sportsmen’s Act

On March 30, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee passed Senate Bill  733, a bipartisan bill entitled the “Sportsmen’s Act.”  The bill’s purposes include to “protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fishing, and shooting.”  S.733 was introduced on March 27 by Senators Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Martin Heinrich (D-NM), Jim Risch (R-ID), Joe Manchin (D-WV), Deb Fischer (R-NE), and Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND).  Just three days later, the Senate Committee passed the bill by a voice vote.

This latest version of the Sportsmen’s Act includes a number of provisions designed to improve opportunities and access for hunters, anglers, recreational shooters, and those who provide services to the sportsmen’s community.  S. 733 also increases agency transparency and accountability for the decision-making that affects hunters and the resources that federal agencies use to provide hunting opportunities.

Key provisions in S. 733 include:

  • Specifically declaring the policy of the United States to include the enhancement of hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting opportunities on federal lands;
  • Continuing to recognize the States’ authority and responsibility for wildlife within their borders;
  • Establishing that Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service lands are open to hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting unless specifically closed to those activities;
  • Placing limits on such closures and imposing requirements for the process for closing lands;
  • Requiring the creation of a list of federal public lands that allow hunting but for which access is a problem;
  • Exempting commercial filming permits for film crews of three or fewer, or for news gathering purposes;
  • Amending the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act to allocate funds for construction and expansion of public target ranges on BLM and Forest Service lands;
  • Adding agency reporting requirements to the Equal Access for Justice Act for monies spent in litigation settlements and awards;
  • Establishing a statutory Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council to advise the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture on wildlife and habitat conservation, hunting, and recreational shooting;
  • Allowing the transport across National Park Service (NPS) land of bows or crossbows that are “not ready for immediate use”; and
  • Confirming it is proper to use qualified volunteers from the hunting community to cull wildlife on NPS land.

Although the bill contains numerous sections providing benefit to hunters, it does not include several provisions that had been part of earlier versions of the Sportsmen’s Act and that are of particular interest to SCI members (e.g., importation of polar bears harvested in 2014).  S. 733 represents a significant start in this Congress’ effort to adopt important sportsmen’s legislation.  SCI will be working with both the House and the Senate toward passage of a bill that will address S.733’s provisions as well as others of concern to our members.  Please continue to monitor your SCI communications and publications for updates on this issue.


Resolution to Overturn Federal Rule on Wildlife Management Passes Senate

Yesterday, the U.S. Senate approved House Joint Resolution 69 with a vote of 52 to 47. This legislation previously passed the House with a bipartisan vote of 225 to 193.

If signed by the President, H.J. Res 69 would nullify the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) rule, “Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska.” Please contact President Trump today and urge him to sign H.J. Res. 69 into law immediately!

The FWS rule prohibited forms of hunting on all National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska and interfered with Alaska’s ability to manage wildlife within its borders.

Click to Apply for Chapter Grants or Scholarships

SCI has led the hunting community in challenging the FWS rule and in fighting for state authority over the management of fish and wildlife and the regulation of hunting, including by filing a lawsuit to challenge the FWS rule and similar regulations adopted by the National Park Service for National Preserves in Alaska.

SCI celebrates the Senate approval of H.J. Res. 69, together with Alaska’s legislative leaders, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the Alaska Board of Game and the numerous sportsmen’s organizations who aggressively pursued this Congressional nullification of the FWS rule.

While a final victory is close, our work is not yet done.  H.J. Res. 69 now heads to the President’s desk. Please contact President Trump and urge him to sign H.J. Res. 69 into law.


%d bloggers like this: