Monthly Archives: June 2017

SCI Applauds Long-Overdue Yellowstone Grizzly Delisting

SCI Applauds Long-Overdue Yellowstone Grizzly Delisting

Safari Club International celebrates with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and hunter-conservationists throughout the country the impending delisting of grizzly bears. The removal of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) population of grizzlies (Ursus arctos horribilis) from the federal threatened species list means that management of this recovered population of bears will finally return to the state agencies who have worked diligently with stakeholders to conserve the population. The GYE population consists of portions of northwestern Wyoming, southwestern Montana and eastern Idaho. Biologists estimate that approximately 700 bears now live in that area.

SCI has long been involved in the grizzly bear delisting saga. The Service first listed the grizzly bears in the lower 48 states as threatened back in 1973. In 2007, the Service delisted the GYE population and were soon after sued in federal court.  SCI joined the suit as an intervenor to defend the delisting. After the district court invalidated the delisting, SCI, along with the other defendants, appealed the ruling. The appellate court affirmed only part of the ruling but the grizzly remained on the threatened species list. Although the Service predicted that it would be able to delist the bears again in 2013, the Service did not propose to remove the GYE population of bears from federal ESA protection until March of 2016. SCI filed two sets of comments in support of the proposed delisting.

The Service will publish a final delist rule in the next few days and the delisting will go into effect 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. Despite decades of recovery efforts, extensive scientific research, and demonstrated recovery, the battle over GYE grizzlies is far from over. At least one anti-hunting group has already stated that they will sue to reverse the delisting. If that happens, SCI is very likely to join that litigation and once again defend the delisting and sustainable use management of the bear.

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New Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Gregory Sheehan Appointed Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

WASHINGTON, DC—Safari Club International (SCI) today praised the appointment of Gregory Sheehan as Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Director Sheehan has served as the Director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources since 2012. He is a member of SCI and has been a key participant for several years at SCI’s annual Western Directors’ Forum at the SCI Convention.

He is an avid hunter and has hunted in the U.S. and in Africa. Director Sheehan is very familiar with many of the issues that affect SCI members and their abilities to hunt and participate in sustainable use conservation in the U.S. and abroad. He has served as Chair of the Threatened and Endangered Policy Committee of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and has been a member of the U.S. Fish andWildlife Service Federal/State Joint ESA Task Force. He also serves on the Board of the Council to Advance Hunting and Shooting Sports.

Director Sheehan has worked for 25 years in the natural resources and wildlife management community. In Utah, he championed a proactive approach to growing and sustaining wildlife populations. During his five years as Utah’s Director, the state’s mule deer population increased by more than 100,000 animals, leading to increased hunting and viewing opportunities for the public.

He is also long-term advocate for shooting sports. Under his leadership the National Archery in the Schools program in Utah tripled its number of participants.

Director Sheehan earned his degree at Utah State University and later received a Masters in Business Administration. He and his wife have been married for 30 years and have two sons.

SCI welcomes Director Sheehan to Washington, D.C. and we look forward to working with him to address the domestic and international wildlife management and conservation concerns of SCI and the broader hunting community.

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SCI has a U.S. based-membership of approximately 38,000 but through our Affiliate Member program we represent930,414 sportsmen and women. Worldwide SCI has 51,000 members and 8,613,742 represented through our Affiliate Membership.

Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.safariclub.org or call (520) 620-1220 for more information

Washington, District of Columbia · Tucson, Arizona
www.safariclub.org · www.safariclubfoundation.org

Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.SafariClub.org, or call (520) 620-1220 for more information.
International Headquarters Tucson, Arizona · Washington, District of Columbia · Ottawa, Canada www.SafariClub.org

Olivia Opre on the Anti-Hunting Movement and What We Can Do

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Olivia Opre on the Anti-Hunting Movement and What We Can Do…

As hunters, we face many challenges in the field: weather, migrations, moon phases, terrain and sometimes plain old bad luck. But, with the onset of social media, our challenges in protecting our hunting traditions have moved into our living rooms and increased exponentially. Social media has allowed anti-hunters to claim an identity otherwise too daunting to embrace, while hiding in the safety of their home behind a computer. As their confidence is gained and their true character is revealed, they become more brazen in making ignorant accusations and spewing vitriol that hurts us as individuals and as hunters.

Many of us fear jeopardizing the safety of ourselves, family and our careers; subsequently, we retract by becoming extremely private and oftentimes avoid engaging in any sort of communication on a social media platform. Where this is completely understandable, there are some of us willing and capable of taking on the fight. To those of you free to embrace this battle, there are things we all need to be on the same page about… starting with a similar message based in good science and facts. Hunting is conservation, and we need to be constantly driving this point home to ensure that it is heard.

As hunters, we also need to be cognizant on how we portray ourselves and the use of trigger words like ‘trophy’, ‘record’, etc., so as not to end the argument before it starts. Additionally, the tastefulness of photos we post often sets the stage for reaction. Finding common ground can be a huge help; for instance, most people appreciate the locally sourced food movement and everyone hates poachers.

The future of our traditions depends upon reaching those on the fence about hunting and in educating our youth… the same people who actively engage on social media. Together, we can share all of the facts and create a more positive public image of hunters and hunting.

I support SCI Foundation and you should too. Stand with us to support science-based conservation and education.

Yours in Conservation,

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Olivia Opre

Hunter, 2014 SCI Diana Award Recipient, Conservationist, and co-host of “Eye of the Hunter”

SCI FOUNDATION is stepping up its fight against “False News” and “Alternative Facts,” and we need your support to make a difference.

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(click above image to learn more)

DONATE TODAY AND DOUBLE YOUR IMPACT!

A generous SCI member and Foundation donor has challenged us to raise more funds for the mission by offering to match the first $25,000 raised. In turn… we are now challenging you to “Double the Impact” of your gift to support wildlife conservation by participating in this limited time charitable giving opportunity.

To learn about more giving options, contact Kimberly Byers at 520-620-1220 ext. 322 or kbyers@safariclub.org


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